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Archive for the ‘4 – Virtual Architecture’ Category

Octagon Building Tutorial – Finally Complete

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on May 1, 2009

This tutorial is the first by Ethos Erlanger.  I hope this is is just the beginning and not simply a one-hit wonder.

Octagon Building Tutorial

The videos that preceded this final version are now gone from the YouTube site. I just hope I did not break any links to the older partially complete tutorial and disappoint anyone in the process.

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Posted in 4 - Virtual Architecture, Education in Second Life, Machinima, Second Life, Tutorials, Videos on YouTube | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Washington Monument in Second Life

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on April 7, 2009

Washington Monument at Shakers Park

Washington Monument at Shakers Park

I want this post to become the introduction to Hylee Bekkers. When I said I had built the Washington Monument, she quickly asked if I had a home for it.  Now it resides with pride at Shakers Park.  I will write more about this wonderful place in a separate post.  And there is so much to say about Hylee.

So, what’s the big deal with an obelisk?  I guess it is like Mount Everest and the climber who says: “…because it is there”.

There were a number of sizes of the Washington Monument that I built.  Each of the larger versions that were more than 10 meters tall presented their own challenges to the construction/assembly methods that I used.

Ethos in front of the Washington Monument

Ethos in front of the Washington Monument

At first I really wanted to do every little detail about the monument.  Some dimensions and even good photos are hard to find of the windows at the observation deck and the entry door at the base.

One thing that was easy to make was the aluminum top.  But it seemed as if no one in SL would even look that high up to check, so I did not do it on the first version of the monument that I set out at Shakers Park.  Then I got a call from a friend to say I had missed it, and I knew there were people out there who cared about the details as much as I did.  So… here is the aluminum tip:

Aluminum Tip on the top of the Washingtom Monument

Aluminum Tip on the top of the Washington Monument

Please come into Second Life and visit Shakers Park to experience it for yourself some time.

Posted in 4 - Virtual Architecture, Friends, Sculpture, Second Life | Tagged: , , | 1 Comment »

The Erlanger Scale

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on April 7, 2009

I gave this scale a name, but have learned that other builders use this same scale but do not have a name for it.  I just wanted a way to define what I am using as a building scale in SL.

I also made a ruler to match.

12 Inch Architects Scale

12 Inch Architects Scale

12 Inch Architects Scale

12 Inch Architects Scale

12 Inch Architects Scale

12 Inch Architects Scale

The Erlanger Scale

Simply put, the Erlanger Scale is based on the relationship between object size in the Real Life and object size in Second Life. The Erlanger Scale is 2ft in RL = 1 meter in SL.

This scale works for most objects and buildings in SL. If doors and windows are built to this scale in SL, the avatar feels as though he is in a comfortably sized room or building.

Furniture is the other key item that is best built to this scale. Most notable is the seating surface such as a chair. When a chair is built to the Erlanger Scale, then most avatars will sit comfortably on that surface without their feet hanging above the floor, or hidden under the floor.

Tools or objects that are held in the hand or worn on the waist of an avatar, look to be the right size when they are designed and built to the Erlanger Scale.

Example: A chair seat is approximately 18 inches off the floor. This is equal to 1.5 ft. the Erlanger Scale in SL converts this easily to 0.75 meters. If you make a simple box (cube) with each dimension of 0.75 meters, an avatar will sit on it in a way that looks similar to Real Life.

The Erlanger Framing hammer was built to this scale and looks to be just the right size when held in the hand of an avatar.

Try it!

A 1 ft ruler that you might find on your desk at school is 12 inches long. (Exactly 1ft.) Divide this by 2 (2ft per meter) and that results in 0.5 meters. Build an item that is 0.5 meters and texture it with the image of a 12inch ruler and your will have a very lifelike object in Second Life.

A common size of office desk is 5ft wide and 2-1/2ft deep. Said another way, it is 30”x60”. The surface of that desk would be approximately 30” off the floor. When built to the Erlanger Scale. The dimensions in SL would be 1.25m x 2.5m and the top of the desk would be 1.25 meter off the floor. Build a desk to these dimensions and seat your avatar at the desk and it is a very effective size for an office desk. A slightly larger desk size might be an executive desk. Those dimensions are typically 36 inches deep and 72 inches wide. That translates to the SL dimensions of 1.5 meters x 3 meters. A desk built to these dimensions would seem to be the right size fore an executive desk in SL.

I first wrote this from the perspective of someone who uses the English measuring system in the United States. I felt it is just as important to discuss how someone using the metric system in RL would calculate and convert measurements in Second Life. I would personally strive to find a simple and common calculation that matches the Erlanger Scale. The closest conversion might be to use a 1.5:1 conversion. In other words, a ½ meter object in real live would be ¾ meter on SL. Written with decimals as most people would in the metric system that would be a 0.5 meter object in RL would be a 0.75 meter object in SL.

The difference between this simplified scale and the Erlanger scale is that objects of common use would be about 8.5% smaller than those made to the Erlanger Scale. For this reason I recommend a factor of 1.6:1 This means that the same object in RL that is 0.5 meters would be 0.8 meters in SL.

For those purists out there, the most accurate calculation to make the Erlanger Scale usable with metric dimensions from RL would be 1.64042 x the RL dimension. This simplification to 1.6 is within 1% of the Erlanger Scale. I urge you to make some items to this scale and see if your find the size to be a good representation of RL objects in your Second Life.

I invite comment and feedback from other resident builders in SL. We all know there are exception in buildings and objects. In fact, one of the beauties of Second Life is that we are all allowed to do our own thing and establish our own standards of construction or none at all.

Posted in 4 - Virtual Architecture, Second Life | Tagged: , , | 2 Comments »

Little Sable Point Lighthouse

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on April 7, 2009

This is another structure that is built to the Erlanger Scale in Second Life.  I would like to write about my research on the topic of lighthouses, but I realize now there are many topics that interest me.  I hope you get to read about the background of this build and I also hope to build another lighthouse.  Time is the enemy on this one.

Little Sable Point Lighthouse

Little Sable Point Lighthouse

Posted in 4 - Virtual Architecture, Second Life | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Fallingwater of Second Life

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on April 7, 2009

Fallingwater in Second Life

Fallingwater in Second Life

This version of Fallingwater has been in Second Life for nearly two years now. I owe a personal debt to Lox Salomon for allowing me to ride his coat tails and work along with him as we recreated Frank Lloyd Wright’s masterpiece. Lox was way ahead of me in his understanding of this structure and he had a smaller scale version on his own land. Lox knew the size would never allow avatars to move freely through it and the house needed to be built larger to be easily entered in SL. When I met him I proposed working together and that was the beginning of a long road. Along the way we met and worked with Ty Jaehun and Cecilia Delacroix. Few works in Second Life are the work of one person and this was no exception.

Other bloggers have written about this build and I appreciate that. I hope from time to time to add more photos and information about this and other examples of great architecture in SL.  Perhaps you may even get to see a part of the FLW’s Second Life here in my blog.

The most important part of this story is the efforts from my friends in SL that made this project come to life and endure.

I move this to a permanent page on this blog so that is does not get lost in all the posts.

Posted in 4 - Virtual Architecture, Second Life | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

Another Post with Photos

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on April 6, 2009

I struggled to understand the process of uploading the photos from Second Life and organizing them on this blog. I am sure I will get the hang of it soon.

Ethos is checking the structural steel and bar joists that were delivered the day before.

Steel I-Beam Delivery

Steel I-Beam Delivery

Some details of the steel i-beams used in construction of the awnings over the entry.

The Main Entry to ESC-1

The Main Entry to ESC-1

This railing illustrates the use of Ethos’ technique of making thin glass in SL. Glass that is this thin is easy if it is flat and not so easy for curved objects.

Balcony Railing

Balcony Railing

This next photo shows the multiple sides of the beveled concrete coping used throughout this project.

Concrete Coping Set between Brick

Concrete Coping Set Between Brick

Octagon Ceiling Plate

Octagon Ceiling Plate

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Photos of my work in Second Life

Posted by Ethos Erlanger on April 6, 2009

esc-1-completed_003

The Final Building in an Aerial View

The Final Building in an Aerial View

esc-1-completed_006

I hope to write about some of these projects, but until I get to that, let the photos speak for me.

This First Roof Area

This First Roof Area

Posted in 4 - Virtual Architecture, Second Life | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »